11 tips for backpacking Southeast Asia

Last update:2017-10-17 13:31:51

Taken from the Rough Guide to Southeast Asia on a Budget, these are our top 11 tips for backpacking Southeast Asia.
With its tempting mix of volcanoes, rainforest, rice fields, beaches and coral reefs, Southeast Asia is one of the most stimulating and accessible regions for independent travel in the world. You can spend the day exploring thousand-year-old Hindu ruins and the night at a rave on the beach; attend a Buddhist alms-giving ceremony at dawn and go whitewater rafting in the afternoon; chill out in a bamboo beach hut one week and hike through the jungle looking for orang-utans the next.
In short, there is enough here to keep anyone hooked for months. Here’s our advice for getting the most out of backpacking Southeast Asia for the first time.

  1. Plan around the weather
    Southeast Asia sits entirely within the tropics and so is broadly characterized by a hot and humid climate that varies little throughout the year, except during the two annual monsoons. Bear in mind, however, that each country has myriad microclimates; for more detail see our “when to go” pages for Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

  2. Get off the beaten track
    Though Southeast Asia has long been on the travellers’ trail, it doesn’t take too much to get off the beaten track – whether it’s to discover that perfect beach or to delve into the lush surrounds of the rainforest. Think about visiting the overlooked city of Battambangin Cambodia, taking the railroad less travelled in Thailand or exploring Myanmar’s unspoiled southern coast.

  3. Try the street food
    This is the home of the world’s tastiest cuisines, and the really good news is that the cheapest is often the best, with markets and roadside hawkers unbeatable places to try the many local specialities. Night markets, in particular, are great for tasting different dishes at extremely low prices – sizzling woks full of frying noodles, swirling clouds of spice-infused smoke and rows of glistening fried insects all make for an unforgettable gastronomic experience.

  4. Budget carefully – but have the odd splurge
    Your daily budget in Southeast Asia depends on where you’re travelling and how comfortable you want to be. You can survive on as little as $20 a day in some countries, but for this money you’ll be sleeping in very basic accommodation, eating at simple food stalls, and travelling on local non-a/c buses. Think about where paying a little more will really enrich your trip.

  5. Learn from the locals
    Tribal culture is a highlight of many visits to less explored areas, and among the most approachable communities are the tribal groups around Sa Pa in Vietnam, the Torjan of Sulawesi in Indonesia, known for their intriguing architecture and ghoulish burial rituals, and the ethnic minority villages surrounding Hsipaw in Myanmar.

  6. Embrace the great outdoors
    Up for getting active? There’s plenty to keep you busy. You can tackle world-class surf at G-land in Indonesia, take a mountain-bike tour of Vietnam’s far north or discover your own lonely bays and mysterious lagoons on a sea-kayak tour of Krabi in Thailand. And that’s just for starters…

  7. Make time for temples
    Southeast Asia’s myriad temple complexes are some of the region’s best-known attractions. The Hindu Khmers left a string of magnificent monuments, the most impressive of which can be seen at Angkor in Cambodia, while the Buddhists’ most impressive legacies include the colossal ninth-century stupa of Borobudur in Indonesia and the temple-strewn plain of Bagan in Myanmar.

  8. Get high
    No, not that kind of high. Every visitor should make an effort to climb one of the spectacular mountains, whether getting up before dawn to watch the sun rise from Indonesia’s Mount Bromo or embarking on the two-day trek to scale Mount Kinabalu in Malaysia.

  9. Hit the beach
    The beaches here are some of the finest in the world, and you’ll find the cream of the crop in Thailand, the Philippines and Malaysia, all of which boast postcard-pretty, white-sand bays, complete with azure waters and wooden beach shacks dotted along their palm-fringed shores. The clear tropical waters also offer supreme diving opportunities for novices and seasoned divers alike.

  10. Take local transport
    Local transport across Southeast Asia is uniformly good value compared to public transport in the West, and is often one of the highlights of a trip, not least because of the chance to fraternize with local travellers. Overland transport between neighbouring countries is also fairly straightforward so long as you have the right paperwork and are prepared to be patient.

  11. Stay healthy
    The vast majority of travellers to Southeast Asia suffer nothing more than an upset stomach, so long as they observe basic precautions about food and water hygiene, and research pre-trip vaccination and malaria prophylactic requirements – but it’s still vital to arrange health insurance before you leave home. Some of the illnesses you can pick up may also not show themselves immediately, so if you become ill within a year of returning home, tell your doctor where you have been.

    For a complete guide to backpacking Southeast Asia, check out The Rough Guide to Southeast Asia on a Budget. Compare flights, book hostels and hotels for your trip, and don’t forget to purchase travel insurance before you go.

Source: Internet

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  1. Best airline to fly with: AirAsia – They’re my personal favorite budget airline to fly with and fly to the most destinations. You will pay for checked luggage so make sure to purchase it when you book your ticket or you will be charged 4x the price when checking in.

  2. Buses are your best friend – Traveling by bus is the way to go in SE Asia if you want to save money. But if you’re tight on time, fly. Always splurge and go for the VIP buses. They’re never that more much and it will be a way better experience.

  3. Laos Kip is very difficult to exchange – If you’re heading to Laos you’ll have no problem getting their local currency but good luck getting rid of it when you’re out of the country. Exchange it before you leave or at the border if crossing by land.

  4. Take local transport – It’s not as bad as you’d expect, it’s cheap and it always makes for an adventure.

  5. Travel throughout the night – Yay for night buses! Vietnam has the best buses for overnight travel because they’re sleeper buses so you can actually lay down. By traveling at night you’ll save on accommodation and have more time to do things during the day!

  6. Get used to haggling – If you don’t haggle you will be over paying for everything. Some things you can’t haggle for (like food), but use your skills while at markets, shops and with transportation. Start low, you can usually tell by the look on the locals face if you’ve gone too low. And don’t be afraid to walk away, most will give in and accept your offer. If they don’t then you’re probably being unrealistic.

  7. Always go for the local beer – It’s cheap and often really good!

  8. Uber and Grab – Grab is the equivalent of Uber, but the Asian version (you can ride on the back of a scooter for cheaper than a car). I recommend these the most for the Philippines.

  9. Bring sunscreen from home – It is ridiculously expensive in SE Asia. It’s one of the few things I recommend bringing that are worth using the extra space in your bag for.

  10. Avoid package tours – Though some are great, they’re always more expensive than doing it yourself. That being said, don’t skip on all. I used tours for trekking in Myanmar, Sapa, and Halong Bay.

Source: Internet

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Packing Tips for Southeast Asia Travel

Last update:2017-10-17 13:27:48

When you travel southeast Asia you want to make sure you have the proper clothes for heat and culture reasons.

  1. Ladies, pack a scarf to easily cover up – This is essential when visiting temples. It’s too hot to always be covered, but you’ll need your shoulders, chest, and knees to be covered when visiting temples. This is a great post on a fabulous piece for your travels.

  2. Pack proper shoes – Treks in SE Asia are quite common, so don’t write them off just yet. With that being said, make sure you have proper shoes. And no those cute no grip Nike’s won’t do the trick (I tried and sprained my ankle!). You’ll also want shoes to easily slip on and off at temples.

  3. Don’t pack too much, clothes are cheap! – Clothes are super cheap and easy to find at markets. Most are pretty cute too. But if you are heavier clothes may be more difficult to find because their sizes are so small!

  4. You better have Imodium – At some point you’ll need it. Especially for long bus rides after eating questionable meat. Or for day trips on boats when bathrooms are not accessible.

  5. Pack appropriate clothes – Please respect the locals and not only pack skinny tanks, short shorts, and belly tops. It’s fine to wear shorts and tanks, and certain places are more open than others, but this is not your home. So dress according to their standards, not yours.

  6. Do not even think about traveling without travel insurance – If you’re not convinced you need it then read these horror stories. And if you need help deciding, here’s a guide that details what to look for.

  7. Whatever you need to sleep on night buses – You’ll probably take at least one during your trip. Have something you can pop to make sure you get as best a sleep you can.

Source: Internet

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Tips for Backpacking Southeast Asia

Last update:2017-10-17 13:50:27
  1. Always have toilet paper – There is never any around, but when you do find some, stock up!

  2. Research cab fares before you arrive – One of the biggest scams in southeast Asia is with cabs ripping people off. Know how much it should cost to get from where you are arriving to your accommodation. You can usually figure out what cabs should cost by asking others you meet on the road. Or find out what cab companies are trusted. Email a hostel and ask.

  3. Know if there will be an ATM – You won’t have a problem with finding ATMs in most of SE Asia, but there will be the odd spot where there are none. Plan ahead! Some examples are El Nido, Philippines and Koh Rong, Cambodia.

  4. Wifi is everywhere, no need to buy SIM cards – Free wifi is honestly way easier to come by than expected and for the most part it is decent. That being said, SIM cards are super cheap so you’re not breaking the bank buying them. But why spend the money when you could easily save? And if you’re worried about getting lost, download Maps.me, an app that doesn’t need wifi to use maps!

  5. Always have USD – If you ever run out of the local currency USD will be accepted. Most boarders require you to pay in USD as well. I recommend getting some in your home country and bringing it with you, though some countries (like Cambodia) dispense USD as well as the local currency.

  6. Research scams to lookout for before you go to a new country/cross borders – A lot of scams in SE Asia are common, so make sure you know what to look out for. Most have to do with cabs, renting scooters, and crossing borders.

  7. Weather! – No, unfortunately the weather is not always perfect and sunny and warm in SE Asia. Parts can get quite cold (like snow cold in northern Vietnam). You’ll also want to avoid monsoon season, especially if visiting an island. And know that the hottest month is generally April (aka you will never stop sweating). It varies from country to country, but traveling in off season can be cheaper.

  8. Don’t be afraid of street food – I’ve seen people get just as sick from eating at sit down restaurants than I have from street food stalls. The only difference is that you can’t see what’s going on in the kitchen.

  9. Agree on a taxi price before you get in – If you don’t you’ll suddenly be expected to pay a ridiculous amount. This is the same for tuk-tuks, motorbike taxis, tricycles, etc.

  10. Don’t expect anything to be on time. But if you’re late, expect it to be on time – The one time you’re late the bus will actually be on time (it happened to me). But for the most part everything leaves late. People in Asia are a lot more relaxed and don’t care about time like we do in the western world.

  11. Take pictures of your scooter before leaving the rental place – Whenever renting anything in SE Asia always take pictures of everything. Including close-ups of the scratches/dents so that they can’t blame you for anything and try to charge you. A good company will mark down any damages on paper and give you a copy or take pictures themselves. Even if they do this still take your own pictures.

  12. Learn some phrases – Learning how to say hello and thank you are a good start and people really appreciate it.

  13. Always keep your calm – This is a must. Never get angry with a local, raise your voice, or get all up in their face. This is not how things are handled in Asia. Trust me, you will never win. The locals will help the locals out, not you.

  14. Always have hand sanitizer – Just like toilet paper, you won’t find soap much.

  15. Get used to the bum gun – For those situations when you don’t have toilet paper. It’s a gun that shoots water to clean yourself. Don’t leave Asia without trying it!

  16. Have at least 6 months validity on your passport – Most countries (this applies for even outside SE Asia) require you to have at least 6 months left on your passport. Otherwise they can deny you entry. The same goes for having blank pages. I’d have a minimum of two blank pages when entering a country.

  17. Always pay the extra couple of bucks for air conditioning – Seriously, you’ll thank me later. Fans just blowing around hot air will not cut it when you’re trying to sleep.

  18. Don’t plan everything before you go – You’ll find the best suggestions from the people you meet while on the road. It is good to have a general idea though!

  19. Expect squatting toilets in most places – I didn’t stay in a hostel that didn’t have regular western toilets, but when traveling from spot to spot, at restaurants, and in public places it was mostly squat toilets.

  20. Never leave your stuff unattended – This is the most important when you’re traveling. Never leave your stuff on the bus unless you have someone watching it for you.

  21. Watch out for snatchers – For ladies I recommend having a cross body bag that you wear cross body or have your hand on at all times. All should hold onto their phones tight. Snatchers are usually people on scooters who will grab your bag or whatever is in your hand quickly while you’re walking, in a tuk tuk or on a bike.

  22. All things whitening – We want to be tanned, but in Asia they want to be white. So watch out when buying products as most will have whitening agents.

  23. If you have big feet and need new shoes, good luck – Asians have way smaller feet than westerns so if you break or lose your flip flops you may have trouble finding a new pair.

  24. Learn to go with the flow and just say yes – People are much more laid back in Asia. Travel Asia and use it as a time to relax. Don’t get caught up with things being late or schedules. Just expect things as they are or it’ll be a nightmare trip for you.

  25. Don’t expect western safety standards – You will have “OMG we’re going to die” moments when driving too close to the edge of a cliff or riding through choppy waves in the ocean. This stuff happens all the time when you backpack through Asia. Also when on a boat never expect there to be enough life jackets so don’t freak out at everything that doesn’t seem “safe.”

  26. Know visa requirements – For every country on your southeast Aia trip you will need to know how much visas will cost, to knowing if you need a picture or not, and what currency to pay in (usually USD). Know if you need to apply online beforehand or if you can get it at the border, or if you need proof of a flight of onward travel (most don’t care but the Philippines is very strict about this).

  27. You will see the same souvenirs over and over again – No need to panic and buy everything at once. Guaranteed you will see the same thing in the next city or country.

  28. Toilet paper does not go down the drain – Don’t flush toilet paper. Be kind to the next person, they don’t want to deal with a clogged toilet. Throw it in the trash bin.

  29. You will see poverty – Prepare yourself. It’s not home. And though you may be traveling to all of the pretty places, while traveling from destination to destination you will see poverty.

  30. Be Prepared to sweat a lot – This is a helpful guide with every possible tip to help you to stop sweating while traveling.

Source: Internet

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Kyoto's Geisha & Maiko

Last update:2016-12-22 10:03:59

Among the many things Japan is famous for, Geishas have definitely put on the top of the list before. After the movie "Memoirs of a Geisha” in 2005, geishas were definitely popularized in the western society. But little of the public known that, the real geishas and their apprentices maikos look vastly different from the actress who portrayed them. As a kimono maniac, my visit to Kyoto(the old capital of Japan) couldn’t have been completed without maiko transformation. It’s among the more costly tourist activities in Kyoto but definitely gives a very different angle to view Kyoto’s history.

Even though commonly known as Geishas altogether, these artisans actually go through an apprentice phase when they’re referred to as Maikos “The Dancing Girl” before being perceived as a Geisha.

This is a real Geisha.
Geisha Front   Geisha Back

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Kyoto's Geisha and Maiko: Part 2

Last update:2016-12-22 10:06:10

This entire process of just hair and makeup took 1-2 hours, which makes sense why most transformation shops just use wigs which they can dress a customer head to toe in less than 1 hour. After another 5 Kgs of kimono and obi put on me, we headed out to Gion for an hour of strolling around and taking photos.

me back
me front

Little did I know, how crazy other tourists can get. The moment the staff helped me off taxi, crowds came surrounding me in a scary speed. Despite the obvious flaws(my tattoo and not a drop of Japanese), people were very excited to meet a maiko-like figure. In reality, maikos only walk on the streets formally dressed in the evening and they walk really fast.

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Halloween Special: The Haunted Everything

Last update:2016-12-14 16:24:56

You thought Halloween is for children’s trick-or-trick and pumpkin carving? Think again. With its Celtic tradition, Halloween has many ghostly and haunting tales, such as pumpkin carved for protection, the lights and candles are to light up the way for the dead, for more Halloween tradition please click here.

Warning: There are graphic images containing blood, abnormal creatures, and things that may be considered inappropriate for children or sensitive adults.
Proceed with caution.

We've got the tamer Halloween zoo at the bottom, so scroll to the bottom to find your fun!

From the origins of witch hunting to the modern day ghost tour, there’s definitely something for every type of spooky on this holiday. Many people travel across the world to visit the castles, asylums, and houses to witness supernatural occurrences. HelloWings Journey has put together a combination list of haunted houses, asylums, and ancient castles for each type of thrill and horror this Halloween.

Scare House - The Basement

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Located in Pittsburgh, PA, Scare House is put together by a group of the local artists and performers. Scare House happens in a building that’s nearly 100 years old in its own history of a First National Bank branch, an Elks Lodge, and now the Scare House. With a history of ghost sighting, Scare House not only offers Haunted shows, it also has the behind-the-scenes tour for those that appreciate the performance but not the horror, and an actual ghost hunt tour to find those who walk among the corridors at night. The Basement tour is the most intense one out of the other activities where participants must sign waivers and be 18+ in order to enter the property and be dragged, blindfolded, and scared out of their mind.The nearest airport is Pittsburgh International Airport(PIT).

The Ram Inn, Gloucestershire, England

the ancient ram inn

A Blogger’s witness to the Ancient Ram Inn: Visit Mr. Humphries who has reside there since 1968...

If you’re more of a historic ghost and witch hunting tour, then The Ram Inn is for you. Located in the village of Wotton-under-Edge, this house has had all sorts of pagan references, even though it was built by St. Mary Church for the slaves and workers to live in while building the church. The location that Ram Inn is built on is also believed to be the intersection of 2 Ley Lines, having a higher spiritual energy; the place has also been noted as a Pagan burial ground more than 5000 years ago.

Pagan burial ground and rituals, church building slave house, and a witch burning at stake, The Ram Inn has changed hands several times. Even when it was later used as a B&B, there were places such as The Bishop’s Room in the house that guests didn’t want to live in. Those who actually dared to live in the room are often woken and scared away in the middle of the night. Even though the current owner John Humphries resides there, The Ram Inn is only open for ghost tours now. And quite frankly, it’s a stunning classical house just to visit.

Leap Castle, Country Offaly, Ireland

Ireland Leap Castle

Being named one of the most haunted castle in Ireland, Leap Castle has hosted several families and witnessed several turmoils since it was built in 1250. It was first owned by Ely O’Carroll clan. Although there were numerous disputes and constant warfares, it was not until 1532 “One eye Teige” of the O’Carroll who stabbed his own brother Thaddeus in the chest while the latter was performing a mass. Ever since that, that chapel where Thaddeus breath last has become the Bloody Chapel.

Leap Castle was later transferred into the Darby’s hands through marriage in the 1600s, and Mildred Darby later enchanted an Elemental evil spirit to the castle. In 1922, when the castle was being remodeled, workers found a secret dungeon behind the Bloody Chapel, where mercenaries and others were thrown into the dungeon by O’Carrolls and die a painful death with wooden spikes going through the lungs and brains. The human bones discovered was enough to cover up the thick wooden spikes and took 3 carts total to remove them. Even though Leap Castle is still a private property owned by Sean and Anne Ryan, private tours are available through booking here. The nearest airports are Shannon Airport(SNN) and Dublin Airport(DUB).

The Catacombs, Paris, France

the catacombs

If you are up to give ghost tour a try but doesn't want to go extreme yet, then the Catacombs would be an ideal choice. Partially made famous by the 2014 film As Above, So Below, The Catacombs hosts a large amount of Parisian and their bones that moved here from 1786 to 1788. Even though the process was conducted with various procedures and blessing, there are still various reports of tourists being choked, whispers, and sudden coldness felt while touring the Catacombs.

Before the Catacombs were offered as a tour, the locals used the crypts as mini concert halls in the late 1800s, how brave! Although not the entire place is open to public, the open part does hosts some amazing skull sculptures, and tours are offered daily but numbers are controlled to preserve the condition underground.

McKamey Manor, San Diego, California

scary Mckamey house

This is the #1 experience to go after if your Halloween is all about haunt and thrill. McKamey has given Haunted House a new definition. This 4-7 hour experience is 21+ only and all who enters must sign a waiver since they will be physically and psychologically "living the horror movie". Many have adored this place and many have hated it, claiming emotional trauma months after the event. Simply go and search for MkKamey Manor's video and it explains exactly what you'll encounter if challenging this tour.

Being much more lengthy than the other haunted houses, the duration often gets people psychologically haunted about half way through the tour, said one of the "survivors". Be warned that this is on the extreme end of the Haunted House series, and it may even surpass those historically haunted buildings. After all, seeing ghost won't leave as much harm on you as being thrown into a dryer and beaten up, or so we hope. The nearest airport is San Diego International Airport(SAN).

Everland Halloween & Horror Night, Seoul, Korea

everland halloween korea

Now let’s talk about Halloween in Asia, a little close and within reach. Typically the Asian ghost doesn’t just haunt on Halloween, they do it year round, and especially on the lunar month of July so called the ghost month. But with the western influence, many Asian cities have started to adapt the feel and incorporated them into the local theme parks.

Disney is one of the more famous Halloween incorporated theme parks, but that’s not quite as the thrill that haunted lovers would be seeking for. So we’ve found Everland in Korea that’s ready to throw a huge haunted party from early September to October 31 every year, with scary performances, spooky zoo, and realistic effects costumes joining all in a parade, it’s a tamer yet still thrilling version for Adults who want a theme park Halloween experience. Band, Pumpkin Garden, Haunted House and shows, and Spooky animals stories, Everland has a good mix of thrill and fun in their annual celebration. The nearest airports are Incheon International Airport(ICN) and Gimpo International Airport(GMP).

Find the airport near you and discover travel destinations here !

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Halloween Special: The Spirit Wheel

Last update:2016-11-23 13:50:56

Halloween is long known to be a holiday for kids, candies, and pumpkin carving! Even though there’re various meaning and traditions that are no longer in mainstream society today, it’s still a holiday that means more than just store going on sale.

Now you’ve got the icon for Halloween spirit, Let’s take a took at them! Find the description right under the picture you got from the spirit wheel.

Halloween Foodies:

    Healthy Halloween Kebab

  • Trick or Treat Expert:
    For other people, Halloween might be about ghost and harvest, but for you it’s a candy, candy, and more candy! Candy Corns, DOTS, Twix, Pumpkin chewy, your house sure to be the most popular house in the neighborhood for trick or treating with kids lining up at the front door. Your expertise started in childhood, being the kid that can always sniff out where those best and exquisite candy are located.
  • Graveyard Cupcake

  • Professional Witchcraft:
    It’s astonishing, really, and in a good way. There are people who can make treats, Halloween treats, but yours are a whole new different level. They are surreal fingers made out of gingerbread, Eyeball Martini that anyone would be scared to drink, your skill is competent to be described as witchcraft, remaking Halloween as thrill and haunting as it could get on a plate or bowl. So, what’s on the recipe for this Halloween? blood vein spaghetti? a human organ appetizer platter? Let us know where to RSVP!

Halloween Beauty Queen:

    Halloween Nail Art

  • Subtly Artistic:
    You have an inner soul crazy for Halloween. Maybe not as extravagant as dressing up as a giant pumpkin for one night or throwing a Halloween themes body parts dinner, but you like to exhibit your Halloween spirit through the festive season. Putting them on your nails is the perfect way, not to flashy, yet it will surely provides some Halloween vibes when you’re doing the dishes or typing at work!
  • Halloween Addam Family

  • The Costume Maniac:
    Halloween is all about dressing up, right?! For you that’s especially true, from Twilight’s vampires and werewolves(that might be trickier) to this year’s Pokémon craze Pikachu or Snorlax, it’s all about being loud and clear with the costumes. The Halloween celebration for you is the all out costumes and props that shouts the holiday as loud as its orange and black color scheme.

Halloween Thrill & Haunted:

    dead girl haunted hysteria hall

  • Max Haunting:
    The ultimate Halloween you’re looking for is with those often unseen by human eyes. Whether it’s a haunted castle from the Iron Age, or a modern haunted house that challenges those who enter with physical and psychological endurance, it’s the trill and scariness that you’re looking for. The unknown of those who’s walked the Earth before us, they stay in the shadowy corners and are ready to terrify those who dare to wake them. The chance to be choked, shoved around, and perhaps see them in person is definitely the most meaningful event for you this Halloween.
  • Pumpkin Corn Maze

  • Pumpkin Harvest:
    With an affection for Pumpkin, your spirit is closer to Halloween’s tradition. It’s traditionally a Celtic festival, where they celebrate a year of harvest and store all the food, getting ready for winter. With harvest also comes the commemoration of loved ones pass away, and that’s why lanterns are carved and lit to guide the dead on their way to home. Even though the lantern later became a haunting sign, but it meant well for friends and families in the beginning, and your Halloween spirit is just as pure and original as those who celebrated for autumn’s harvest.

A Simple Click,
365-Prices Revealed onOne Chart.

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Korea Part Three: Doing Non-Touristy Stuff

Last update:2016-11-23 13:28:21

KPOP Dance Lessons in Seoul

Hallyu (aka Korean Wave) has grew tremendously over the WORLD within the last 5 years or so. Even if you don’t know what K=pop is, I’m sure you will know what Gangnam Style is.

Many people go “WOW” and “AHHH” & “OMG” when they see this in the itinerary but I’m like totally “…” No longer that young to be not shy to dance in front of everyone else..

(Random Joke) All along, I read “KPOP Contest” as “KPOP Concert” in the itinerary, thinking that Thursday evening = M! Countdown and that we would be given a chance to watch the famous music show. I was so excited about this activity from the moment I saw the itinerary, when I won the event, when I accepted the invitation, all until I saw the full itinerary which says “K-POP Contest: ….. now it is time to show off your k-pop song and dance skills as a team” I totally died when I read that line. D:

Anyway, despite the fear and anxiety and everything bad, I actually enjoyed the lesson and learn more about the whole K-wave culture among Korean youths.

We went to ENT Dance Studio (I can’t seem to find the address) for our lessons.

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The Lake View Toya Nonozake Resort

Last update:2016-11-23 13:25:16

Despite running late for our buffet dinner (included in hotel’s price), we took a break at an observation area which was directly opposite the action and buzz of all the other Lake Toya resorts and hotels.

As it was close to dinner time, this place was.. empty; but I like it this way. The temperature dipped as the sun sets and we were pretty much braving the wind as we walked around the area. We also spotted a helicopter which probably offered bird’s eye view tour of the vicinity. The gift shop/restaurant at that area was not open too.

 Lake Toya view

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